Your search returned over 400 essays for "David Hume"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>

Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding by David Hume

- David Hume wrote Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding in 1748, right in the middle of the Enlightenment and on the eve of the Industrial and Scientific Revolution. So it only makes sense that some of the ideas and comparisons used are slightly outdated, but science, if anything, helps his argument regarding causality. Hume is ultimately concerned with the origins of causality, how we are able to gain knowledge from causality, and if we can even call the knowledge derived from causality real knowledge....   [tags: David Hume, Enlightenment]

Strong Essays
1049 words | (3 pages) | Preview

How We Gain Knowledge and What We Do with Knowledge: David Hume

- David Hume was an imperialist philosopher who revolutionized scientific argument and methodology with his skepticism. His arguments about the way people though up to his day, and still today, are fundamental in explaining how we gain knowledge and what we do with this knowledge. Hume helped pave a road leading toward a higher state of consciousness for humanity with his theory concerning the perceptions of the mind. He divided the minds perception into two distinct group's impression and ideas. With these two classifications Hume rationalized the depths of human understanding....   [tags: David Hume, Knowledge, philosophy]

Powerful Essays
1766 words | (5 pages) | Preview

David Hume - Naturalistic Metaethics, Politics, and Psychology

- David Hume - Naturalistic Metaethics, Politics, and Psychology ABSTRACT: According to the views expressed in this paper, influences unrelated to the conclusions of Immanuel Kant and G. E. Moore respecting what they saw as the appropriate foundation for moral systems seems to have been at work in the reactions of both to the earlier criticisms of David Hume. Building on a "recent meeting" with Hume in a pub on Princes Street in Edinburgh, I develop the suggestion that both Kant and Moore were loyal to traditional notions of an intuited, non-prudential basis for ethical injunctions....   [tags: Philosophy David Hume]

Free Essays
3933 words | (11.2 pages) | Preview

On Emotion and Value in David Hume and Max Scheler

- On Emotion and Value in David Hume and Max Scheler ABSTRACT: While some philosophers tend to exclude any significance of emotion for the moral life, others place them in the center of both the moral life and the theory of value judgment. This paper presents a confrontation of two classic positions of the second type, namely the position of Hume and Scheler. The ultimate goal of this confrontation is metatheoretical — particularly as it concerns the analysis of the relations between the idea of emotion and the idea of value in this kind of theory of value judgment....   [tags: David Hume Max Scheler Philosophy Essays]

Powerful Essays
2866 words | (8.2 pages) | Preview

David Hume and Future Occurrences

- In An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding, David Hume demonstrates how there is no way to rationally make any claims about future occurrences. According to Hume knowledge of matters of fact come from previous experience. From building on this rationale, Hume goes on to prove how, as humans we can only make inferences on what will happen in the future, based on our experiences of the past. But he points out that we are incorrect to believe that we are justified in using our experience of the past as a means of evidence of what will happen in the future....   [tags: Philosophy Hume Philosophical Essays]

Free Essays
1020 words | (2.9 pages) | Preview

David Hume on the Existence of Miracles

- In this paper I will look at David Hume’s (1711-1776) discussion from the An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, Section X, Of Miracles regarding whether it is a reasonable assumption to believe in the existence of miracles. I will first discuss why the existence of miracles matters and how miracles relate to our understanding of the laws of nature. Secondly, I will look at how Hume argues that it is never reasonable to believe in miracles. I will then provide objections to this argument which I feel support the idea that belief is not only reasonable but a necessary condition for a faithful life....   [tags: phylosphical analysis]

Powerful Essays
1462 words | (4.2 pages) | Preview

Of the Standard of Taste by David Hume

- David Hume’s essay, "Of The Standard of Taste," is one of the most revered of the copious works on what is referred to as aesthetics. Although, he is better known for his other works, such as, "A treatise of human Nature," "An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding," and "An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals," all in which he shows how limited a role reason has in the lives of humans. This subjective view is also present in "Of The Standard of Taste": aesthetic judgments are based on personal feeling more than they are on reason....   [tags: principles of morals, aesthetic judgement]

Powerful Essays
1366 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Of the Standard of Taste

- David Hume’s essay “Of the Standard of Taste” addresses the problem of how objects are judged. Hume addresses three assumptions about how aesthetic value is determined. These assumptions are: all tastes are equal, some art is better than others, and aesthetic value of art is defined by a person’s taste(from lecture). However, Hume finds the three beliefs to be an “inconsistent triad”(from lecture) of assumptions. If all taste is equal but taste defines the aesthetic value, how can it be that some art is good and others bad....   [tags: Literary Analysis]

Strong Essays
1347 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Of the Standard of Taste

- Introduction Aesthetics is, to put it simply, the study of art, beauty, and judgments thereof. As society tends to not view art as a functional endeavour, this branch of study may seem pointless; in fact a well-known aesthete and self-proclaimed Professor of Aesthetics, Oscar Wilde, stated “All art is quite useless.” However, this sentence is misleading, and the same man also said "Aestheticism is a search after the signs of the beautiful. It is the science of the beautiful through which men seek the correlation of the arts....   [tags: aesthetics, subjectivism, perspective]

Good Essays
533 words | (1.5 pages) | Preview

Quest on the Mind: David Hume

- David Hume, the insightful philosophical wonderer who asks the questions about ourselves the limitations we are bound to, and what truly makes human beings what we are. In specific Hume is trying to persuade us into the understanding of matters of fact, in which we base our lives upon and form habits towards certain things and how we grow accustom to other things surrounding us. After all, we do not know how things are going to turn out to be, we can only assume from previous experiences we have had, that things will turn out the same as they did in past through cause and effect and in Hume’s words custom and habit....   [tags: insightful philosophical wonderer]

Better Essays
833 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

The Bundle Theory by David Hume

- The mystery of consciousness has puzzled humans for thousands of years. We feel pain, hunger, and countless other perceived emotions that we know to be true. We are all aware that we are conscious; however, nobody has discovered whether or not the human body is organized in a specific way that leads to consciousness. The fact is that the existence of consciousness, the very essence of knowledge, is undeniable, regardless of the lack of a concrete systematic organization of facts to explain it....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1369 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Theory of Ethics

- David Hume is considered to be one of the big three British empiricists, along with Hobbes and Locke, and lived near the end of the Enlightenment. The Catholic Church was losing its control over science, politics and philosophy and the Aristotelian world view was being swallowed up by a more mechanistic viewpoint. Galileo found the theory provided by Copernicus to be correct, that our earth was not the center of everything, but the celestial bodies including the earth circled the sun. Mathematicians abounded....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Better Essays
1677 words | (4.8 pages) | Preview

David Hume: Vices and Virtues

- Hume: Vices and Virtues Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental problems such as those regarding existence, reality, knowledge, values, the human mind and language. “I think, therefore I am” is a famous quotation that attempts to define this study very simply, and the philosopher quoted was Rene Descartes, a 17th century Frenchman who is widely regarded as the Father of Modern Philosophy. David Hume was an 18th century Scotsman who is considered by many to be the most important philosopher ever to write in English....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1060 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Philosophy of David Hume

- "The human brain starts working the moment you are born and never stops until you stand up to speak in public." –( George Jessel ). One can say or try and dissect the brain and try to figure what’s going on inside of it and that’s what Philosophers today try to accomplish, but a question can be raised from this. Why is that why must the brain be dissected. This question is raised for the simple fact that Philosophers really want to know what’s going on the human brain. This can also go back to “knowing” and believing in something that can be proven as a fact....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Powerful Essays
1929 words | (5.5 pages) | Preview

David Hume and Justice

- David Hume is considered a reputable and influential philosopher whose empirical approach provided a basis for a number of moral principles. Although the complexity of Hume’s expressive nature and intellectual thought is somewhat mindboggling to most readers, the importance of the account of justice can be seen as significant and of relevance to many values and morals in even today’s society. Hume’s discussion of moral virtues in his book An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals addresses the importance of justice in terms that relate to its sole foundation and further exemplification of moral distinctions....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1257 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

David Hume´s Philosophy

- Hume’s Epistemology David Hume was a Scottish philosopher known for his ideas of skepticism and empiricism. Hume strived to better develop John Locke’s idea of empiricism by using a scientific study of our own human nature. We cannot lean on common sense to exemplify human conduct without offering any clarification to the subject. In other words, Hume says that since human beings do, as a matter of fact, live and function in this world, observation of how humans do so is imminent. The primary goal of philosophy is simply to explain and justify the reasoning of why we believe what we do....   [tags: Ideas,Impressions]

Better Essays
889 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

David Hume And The Middle Of A Philosophic Dialogue

- David Hume was a Scottish philosopher who lived in the 18th century. Hume marked a turning point in philosophy with his now almost infamous skepticism. And while he claimed to be a mild skeptic, the ramifications of his claims were felt by all subsequent philosophers. His critique was impactful for the sheer variety of subjects Hume seemingly uprooted. One such subject that Hume assaulted with his arguments was the idea of personal identity. Hume is in the middle of a philosophic dialogue were people reason metaphysical claims from arguments predicated upon the existence of the self....   [tags: Mind, Perception, Consciousness, John Locke]

Strong Essays
1235 words | (3.5 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Argument on Passion and Morality

- Why is incest deplorable amongst humans, but not for dogs. What makes it acceptable for a man to kill a deer, but wrong if he kills another man. Why do these lines get drawn between humans and animals. David Hume has an answer to these questions. Though many philosophers, like Saint Augustine, argue that humans are morally different from animals because of their capability to reason, Hume states that it is passion and sentiment that determines morality. In his book, Treatise with Human Nature, Hume claims that vice and virtue stems from the pleasure or pain we, mankind, feel in response to an action not from the facts that we observe (Hume, 218)....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1149 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

David Hume And Jean Paul Sartre

- ... Soren K. belief of his family being cursed brought upon the disruption of the relationship between his father, Michael Kierkegaard and himself. Also in addition, it led to the broken engagement with Regine Olsen. At 27 years old, Soren Kierkegaard was engaged to Regine Olsen, who was only 18 at the time, until Soren decided to call it off one year later. There were exactly two reasons as to why Soren decided to call off his engagement with Regine Olsen even though, both of them loved each other....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism]

Better Essays
1067 words | (3 pages) | Preview

David Hume 's Theory Of Induction

- Problem of Induction In this paper, I will discuss Hume’s “problem of induction,” his solution to the problem, and whether or not his solution to the problem is correct. In David Hume 's 'An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding ', Hume states that no actual proof exists to suggest that future occurrences will happen the way previous occurrences did. His solution to this “problem of induction” is that our beliefs about cause and effect are based out of pure habit of thought that we have become accustomed to....   [tags: Inductive reasoning, Reasoning]

Strong Essays
917 words | (2.6 pages) | Preview

David Hume 's Copy Principle

- ... At the time, Hume did not think it was something of significance that could go against this idea of the copy principle. Nancy Kendrick uses this missing shade of blue to show that this counter example actually provides Hume with an empiricist and non-nativist example of an idea’s priority to experience and, therefore, vitalizes, rather than diminishes his most key empiricist purposes. Moreover, Kendrick also uses John Lock as a reference in support to Hume’s claims in rejecting innate ideas, and in turn understanding the missing shade of blue....   [tags: John Locke, Empiricism, Mind, Idea]

Better Essays
1059 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Philosophy: John Locke, David Hume

- This is a philosophical question that has been proven ultimately difficult to answer. I believe it is as a result of the complexity of the consent theory. For a theory that places high emphasis on autonomy and freedom, the most obvious basis for legitimate political authority should be some form of voluntary, self-assumed obligation. However, some philosophers such as John Locke and Charles Beitz argue that tacit consent can ground obligation to obey the state’s law while others such as Hanna Pitkin and David Hume counter this argument with the opinion that tacit consent is not sufficient to ground political obligation....   [tags: political theory essay ]

Strong Essays
1130 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

An Analysis of David Hume's Affirmation

- David Hume makes a strong affirmation in section IV of an Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding. Hume states, "I shall venture to affirm as a general proposition, which admits of no exception, that the knowledge of this relation is not, in any instance attained by reasonings a priori; but entirely from experience." In this statement, when discussing "knowledge of this relation," Hume is referring to the relation between cause and effect. This argument can easily be dismissed as skeptical, for it puts all knowledge of this sort in doubt....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Good Essays
753 words | (2.2 pages) | Preview

Analysis of Suicide by David Hume

- Analysis of Of Suicide by David Hume "I believe that no man ever threw away life, while it was worth keeping." In David Hume's essay "Of Suicide," the philosophical argument of justified suicide is pursued. However, the underlying argument focuses on the injustification of the government and society condemning and forbidding such an action and the creation of superstitions and falsehoods of religion and God. Hume argues that the last phases that a person goes through before taking his life is those of "disorder, weakness, insensibility, and stupidity," and that those traits, when obvious to the mind, doom him to a death by his own decision....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Better Essays
908 words | (2.6 pages) | Preview

David Hume on Sentiments and Reason

- In Appendix I., Concerning Moral Sentiment, David Hume looks to find a place in morality for reason, and sentiment. Through, five principles he ultimately concludes that reason has no place within the concept of morality, but rather is something that can only assist sentiment in matters concerning morality. And while reason can be true or false, those truths or falsities apply to facts, not to morality. He then argues morals are the direct result of sentiment, or the inner feeling within a human being....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1553 words | (4.4 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Theory of Knowledge

- Knowledge is gained only through experience, and experiences only exist in the mind as individual units of thought. This theory of knowledge belonged to David Hume, a Scottish philosopher. Hume was born on April 26, 1711, as his family’s second son. His father died when he was an infant and left his mother to care for him, his older brother, and his sister. David Hume passed through ordinary classes with great success, and found an early love for literature. He lived on his family’s estate, Ninewells, near Edinburgh....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Good Essays
855 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

Of Miracles by David Hume

- "Of Miracles" by David Hume In David Hume?s paper ?Of Miracles,. Hume presents a various number of arguments concerning why people ought not to believe in any miracles. Hume does not think that miracles do not exist it is just that we should not believe in them because they have no rational background. One of his arguments is just by definition miracles are unbelievable. And have no rational means in believing miracles. Another argument is that most miracles tend to come from uncivilized countries and the witnesses typically have conflicts of interest and counterdict each others experiences....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Better Essays
937 words | (2.7 pages) | Preview

David Hume and His Thoughts

- David Hume and His Thoughts Hume begins his argument by observing that there is “a great variety of taste, as well as of opinions, which prevails the world.” This diversity is found among people of the same background and culture within the same group and is even more pronounced among “distance nations and remote ages.” A “standard of taste” would provide a definite way to reconcile this diversity. By taste, Hume refers to impressions or emotional responses associated with beauty and ugliness....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Better Essays
739 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

Pragmatism, Empiricism and David Hume

- Pragmatism, Empiricism and David Hume Pragmatism is based on the philosophy that ideas must be tested and re-tested, that experiences dictate reality. Pragmatists also believe in no absolute truths or values existing. David Hume argues that, “no proof can be derived from any fact, of which we are so intimately conscious; nor is there anything of which we can be certain, if we doubt this” (Treatise 2645). Hume’s empiricist ideals were roots to early pragmatic thought, by way of the theory that, in our reality, nothing is certain and everything that can be sensed must be constantly qualified to find a place in reality....   [tags: essays research papers]

Free Essays
611 words | (1.7 pages) | Preview

David Hume 's Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding

- Everyone will easily agree that there is a noticeable difference between the perceptions of the mind. David Hume recognises these differences and divides the mental contents into two classes, which are ideas, and impressions. Hume has provided arguments in order to support his claim of the ‘Copy Principle’, which state that ideas are copies of impressions, and every idea is derived from an impression. He proposes this principle, in an attempt to explain how we form the beliefs about the world. While his claim is wildly accepted by many philosophers, there are still problems to his principle which Hume ignored as something insufficient....   [tags: Mind, Thought, Logic, Philosophy]

Better Essays
751 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Theory of Causality

- What Came First: The Chicken or the Egg. David Hume moves through a logical progression of the ideas behind cause and effect. He critically analyzes the reasons behind those generally accepted ideas. Though the relation of cause and effect seems to be completely logical and based on common sense, he discusses our impressions and ideas and why they are believed. Hume’s progression, starting with his initial definition of cause, to his final conclusion in his doctrine on causality. As a result, it proves how Hume’s argument on causality follows the same path as his epistemology, with the two ideas complimenting each other so that it is rationally impossible to accept the epistemology and not...   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
2065 words | (5.9 pages) | Preview

David Hume 's Principles Of Uniformity Of Nature

- Scottish philosopher David Hume is amongst one of the most influential empirical philosophers to date for his work in epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of religion. As an Empiricist Hume claimed that the only way we can obtain knowledge is through our senses however he argues true knowledge is unattainable for all intent and purpose, due to the problem of induction.By briefly examining Hume 's problem of induction and it 's dependancy to of the so called principles of Uniformity of Nature we could come to a conclusion that Hume 's is correct....   [tags: Logic, Inductive reasoning, Scientific method]

Strong Essays
1156 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Theory of Knowledge

- Empiricism (en- peiran; to try something for yourself): The doctrine that all knowledge must come through the senses; there are no innate ideas born within us that only require to be remembered (ie, Plato). All knowledge is reducible to sensation, that is, our concepts are only sense images. In short, there is no knowledge other than that obtained by sense observation. Remember that according to Descartes, what I know first and foremost are my ideas. It is only later that he seeks to know if the extramental world exists, and so he begins with his ideas and then moves towards real being (rather than vice versa)....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Free Essays
1350 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

David Hume and Future Occurrences

- David Hume, in An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding, discusses how we cannot predict the future. Even though our experiences and our reasoning tell us that objects act in a predictable way, we still cannot prove how objects will act in the future based upon previous interactions. After biting into a piece of pizza we expect an enjoyable taste. This enjoyable taste is expected because our past experiences have proven this to us. Even though we think we can predict that the pizza will act the same as our previous experiences, it may just blow up upon biting....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Good Essays
749 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Argument Against Belief in the Existence of Miracles

- David Hume was a British empiricist, meaning he believed all knowledge comes through the senses. He argued against the existence of innate ideas, stating that humans have knowledge only of things which they directly experience. These claims have a major impact on his argument against the existence of miracles, and in this essay I will explain and critically evaluate this argument. In his discussion 'Of Miracles' in Section X of An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, Hume defines a miracle as “a violation of the laws of nature and as a firm and unalterable experience has established these laws”1....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Term Papers
1988 words | (5.7 pages) | Preview

David Hume and Karl Marx’s Critiques of Religion

- Where does religion come from. Many have tried to answer this question, only leaving us with more questions than answers. This essay will focus on two philosophers David Hume and Karl Marx both has strong critiques on the existence of God. Both going against the design argument, the design argument is the argument for the existence of God or single creator; however, with Hume’s empiricist and Marx's atheist they both attack the design argument in different ways, ultimately coming to the same conclusion and that is there is no God....   [tags: religion]

Strong Essays
1272 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

The Effect of Rene Descartes and David Hume on the Philosophical World

- Rene Descartes and David Hume both have had a profound effect on the philosophical world. Both these philosophers are associated explicitly with two separate schools of philosophy which are Rationalism and Empiricism. It is this division between Rationalism and Empiricism that allows for Descartes and Hume to present differing accounts of the mind and mentality. Descartes is widely recognized as the father of modern philosophy, he is a rationalist, who considers knowledge of the metaphysical as existing separate from physical reality believing that truth cannot be acquired through the senses but through the intellect in the form of deductive reasoning....   [tags: rationalism, empirism]

Strong Essays
1078 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Distinction Between Natural and Artificial Virtues

- In David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature, he divides the virtues of human beings into two types: natural and artificial. He argues that laws are artificial and a human invention. Therefore, he makes the point that justice is an artificial virtue instead of a natural virtue. He believed that human beings are moral by nature – they were born with some sense of morality and that in order to understand our “moral conceptions,” studying human psychology is the key (Moehler). In this paper, I will argue for Hume’s distinction between the natural and artificial virtues....   [tags: A Treatise of Human Nature]

Strong Essays
1049 words | (3 pages) | Preview

David Hume 's Theory On Sensory Experience

- ... • Not to get confused not ever idea is the mirror image of a single impression, it can however be a mixture of impressions one has found common compounds in. • “from what impression is that supposed idea derived?” (266) was a question Hume would ask, his theory could be applied to possibly anything, even the idea if God. • The way our ideas are grouped according to Hume is a process where less connected ideas are absolved and united to the ideas that have been elaborated to a clear understanding....   [tags: Mind, Thought, Cognition, Idea]

Better Essays
1006 words | (2.9 pages) | Preview

A Defense of David Hume's Moral Sense Theory

- In this paper I will defend David Hume’s Moral Sense Theory, which states that like sight and hearing, morals are a perceptive sense derived from our emotional responses. Since morals are derived from our emotional responses rather than reason, morals are not objective. Moreover, the emotional basis of morality is empirically proven in recent studies in psychology, areas in the brain associated with emotion are the most active while making a moral judgment. My argument will be in two parts, first that morals are response-dependent, meaning that while reason is still a contributing factor to our moral judgments, they are produced primarily by our emotional responses, and finally that each ind...   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Term Papers
2350 words | (6.7 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of David Hume 's Dialogues Of Natural Religion

- ... Philo demonstrates what a weak comparison it would be to assume a similarity between the circulation of blood in humans to the circulation of sap in vegetation. (pg. 54). This Philo implies, would be the same as Cleanthes analogy comparing our experience of the universe to our experience of machines. Furthermore, we have experience with the origin and operation of many machines and their creators, yet we have experience with only one universe, he points out that our experience of the universe is quite limited and it is unreasonable to apply our experience with our meager portion of the universe to the whole....   [tags: Religion, Faith, Philosophy, Causality]

Better Essays
1190 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

A Treatise of Human Nature: David Hume´s Philosophy

- It seems most appropriate, before having any mention of Hume’s philosophy, to briefly enunciate the concept of empiricism. Prior to Immanuel Kant’s solicitation of Transcendental Idealism, the schools of epistemological thought were divided into rationalism and the aforementioned empiricism. The former is the belief that knowledge is innate, and that logic and reason are the chief methods of acquiring that knowledge. Conversely, empiricists believe that knowledge is sensory, or experience, based; in essence, that human beings are tabula rasa....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Better Essays
787 words | (2.2 pages) | Preview

David Hume 's Philosophy / Free Will Essay

- Megell Strayhorn Period: 7 Goldberg/ Philosophy/ Free Will Essay/ Autumn 2014 11-17-14 To answer the question if human beings possess free will successfully, you have to understand what ‘free will’ actually means. Free will is having the the power of acting without the constraint of necessity or fate. The ability to act on one 's own desires. There are a couple different ways of answering the free will question that get broken down into three main beliefs; Compatibilism, Libertarianism, and Determinism....   [tags: Free will, Determinism, Causality, Metaphysics]

Strong Essays
1079 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion

- ... As an empiricist and a skeptic, he calls to “let us become thoroughly sensible of the weakness, blindness, and narrow limits of human reason.” (131) Philo believes that because humans have been historically ignorant about science and the universe, that humanity especially has no right to speculate about theology. He continues by calling out the “contradictions which adhere to the very ideas of matter, cause and effect, extension, space, time, motion; and in a word, quantity of all kinds, the object of the only science that can fairly pretend to any certainty or evidence....   [tags: skepticism, philosophy]

Term Papers
1522 words | (4.3 pages) | Preview

Philosophy of David Hume

- Philosophy in itself is an unidentifiable subject matter because of the lack of specificity in the fields it touches upon. It is “defined” as a way for humans to strive for ourselves in this reality in which we live in. No one person has the answers as to who we are and why we are living. The value of philosophy changes in character as history changes, thus the meaning of philosophy is what we as individuals perceive it to be. Though subjective, there are core ideals that unite the beliefs of all philosophy, such as the idea of the self....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Powerful Essays
1628 words | (4.7 pages) | Preview

Agreeing With David Hume's Theory on Miracles

- I will argue that Hume's argument is plausible in explaining why it is highly improbable for a miracle to occur because no testimony given by a person can establish a miracle, as it would require an explanation that overrules the laws of nature, which is highly unlikely. I agree with Hume's argument, and believe that it is correct; however, there are some objections I have in regards to some of his points. The central claim that Hume is trying to make is that no testimony given by a person can establish a miracle....   [tags: philosophy, beliefs, miracle]

Strong Essays
1107 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

David Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion

-      In Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion we are introduced to three characters that serve the purpose to debate God and his nature, more specifically, what can mankind infer about God and his nature. The three characters; Demea, Philo, and Cleanthes all engage in a debate concerning this question and they all serve the purpose of supporting their views on the subject. It is the “argument from design” put forth by Cleanthes that is the focal point of the discussion, and it is Demea and Philo who attempt to discredit it....   [tags: Hume Religious Essays]

Powerful Essays
1522 words | (4.3 pages) | Preview

David Hume

- David Hume Hume, David, 1711-76, Scottish philosopher and historian. Hume carried the empiricism of John Locke and George Berkeley to the logical extreme of radical skepticism. He repudiated the possibility of certain knowledge, finding in the mind nothing but a series of sensations, and held that cause-and-effect in the natural world derives solely from the conjunction of two impressions....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1198 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

David Hume

-       "There are more things n heaven and Earth than dreamt of in your philosophy" (Shakespeare, 211).  This quote from William Shakespeare's The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark presents quite an idea.  It suggests that in our modern philosophy we have not even began to scratch the surface of what causes the nature of things around us.  Our philosophy is centered on the idea of cause and effect.  Whether a person realizes it, every standpoint that they argue from is based on a cause and/or its effect.  There isn't necessarily anything wrong with this, but most people don't bother to analyze what the true connection is between a cause and it's effect.  David Hume does an outstanding job...   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Free Essays
1296 words | (3.7 pages) | Preview

Comparing David Hume and Immanuel Kant

- Comparing David Hume and Immanuel Kant David Hume and Immanuel Kant each made a significant break from other theorists in putting forward a morality that doesn’t require a higher being or god, for a man to recognize his moral duty. Although Hume and Kant shared some basic principals they differed on their view of morality. In comparing the different views on human will and the maxims established to determine moral worth by David Hume and Immanuel Kant, I find their theories on morality have some merit although limited in view....   [tags: Philosophy Morality Papers]

Powerful Essays
1368 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Anti Miracle Belief

- The problem of miracles is an ancient one that has persisted for most of human history, but that has been addressed with some depth only in the last few centuries. The great empiricist philosopher David Hume was one of the first to present an analysis of miracles that tried to explain why they are created (by human beings themselves, in Hume’s opinion) and why people are so ready to believe in them. This is an important field of study, as with greater knowledge of the character of physical law, one finds more and more (rather than less) accounts of miracles being touted as exceptions to natural laws....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Powerful Essays
1579 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

David Hume’s Treatment of Mind

- This paper critically examines Hume’s argument against the knowledge/existence of substantival mind. This denial is rooted in his epistemology which includes a theory of how complex ideas which lack corresponding impressions are manufactured by the imagination, in conjunction with the memory, on the basis of three relations among impressions: resemblance, continuity and constant conjunction. The crux of my critique consists in pointing out that these relations are such that only an enduring, unified agent could interact with them in the way Hume describes....   [tags: Philosophy Papers]

Powerful Essays
3820 words | (10.9 pages) | Preview

Analysis of Suicide by David Hume

- Hume on Suicide ONE considerable advantage that arises from Philosophy, consists in the sovereign antidote which it affords to superstition and false religion. All other remedies against that pestilent distemper are vain, or at least uncertain. Plain good sense and the practice of the world, which alone serve most purposes of life, are here found ineffectual: History as well as daily experience furnish instances of men endowed with the {2} strongest capacity for business and affairs, who have all their lives crouched under slavery to the grossest superstition....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Good Essays
694 words | (2 pages) | Preview

David Hume and Future Occurrences

- Hume asked, "what reason do we have in thinking the future will resemble the past?" It is reasonable to think that it will because there is no contradiction in supposing the future won't resemble the past. But it is also true that is possible for the world to change dramatically and our previous experience would be completely useless in judging future experience. We want to say that past experiences have been a good predictor. We are compelled to do so and it is almost as if we can't help ourselves....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1105 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

Different Viewpoints of Empiricist Philosphers: John Locke, David Hume, George Berkley

- Empiricists are philosophers who argue that knowledge comes from sensory experience. This means that whatever we experience through our senses are the only ideas that can be epistemically justified. John Locke, David Hume, and George Berkley are three of the most influential empiricists in modern philosophical history. Though sharing the same premise about knowledge stemming from sensory experience and having some common ground in certain areas, each philosopher had different views on what we can and cannot know through empirical evidence about the universe....   [tags: state, justification, sensory experience]

Powerful Essays
2175 words | (6.2 pages) | Preview

Enquiries Concerning Human Understanding by David Hume

- The way in which a concept comes to exist in one’s mind is itself a concept worth examining. Many philosophers have looked for the origin of thought in the human mind, and many different reasons for this origin have been put forth. As a philosopher, it is only fitting that Hume would propose his own framework for human thinking. For Hume, perceptions are developed either as the understanding of the outside world, or as recollections of these events or alterations of these memories within the mind¹....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism, 2015]

Strong Essays
1294 words | (3.7 pages) | Preview

David Hume on Miracles

- Hume’s empiricist ideology clearly informed his position on the topic of miracles. In the following, I will examine Hume’s take on empiricism. From this it will be possible to deduce how Hume’s empiricism played a prominent role in influencing his belief on miracles. First, what were the principles of Hume’s empiricism. Hume claims that everyone is born with a blank slate (tabula rasa). The tabula rasa receives impressions which are products of immediate experience. For example, the color of the computer screen I am looking at represents an impression....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1330 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Mind Game

- Hume's Mind Game The human mind is a very intricate machine. There have been many people that have attempted, and failed, to explain how the human mind operates. After reading Hume, I was in agreement with a lot of what he was explaining. Hume, in my mind, has come the closest to uncovering the minds operations. Robert Hume dealt with a lot of what Decarte talked about in his writings. The difference between Decarte and Hume is that Hume "ironed out" a lot of the "wrinkles" that Decarte left behind....   [tags: essays research papers]

Free Essays
566 words | (1.6 pages) | Preview

David Hume: On Miracles

- In explaining Hume’s critique of the belief in miracles, we must first understand the definition of a miracle. The Webster Dictionary defines a miracle as: a supernatural event regarded as to define action, one of the acts worked by Christ which revealed his divinity an extremely remarkable achievement or event, an unexpected piece of luck. Therefore, a miracle is based on one’s perception of past experiences, what everyone sees. It is based on an individuals own reality, and the faith in which he/she believes in, it is based on interior events such as what we are taught, and exterior events, such as what we hear or see first hand....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Powerful Essays
1899 words | (5.4 pages) | Preview

David Hume On Empiricism

- Hume On Empiricism The ultimate question that Hume seems to be seeking an answer to is that of why is that we believe what we believe. For most of us the answer is grounded in our own personal experiences and can in no way be justified by a common or worldly assumption. Our pasts, according to Hume, are reliant on some truths which we have justified according to reason, but in being a skeptic reason is hardly a solution for anything concerning our past, present or future. Our reasoning according to causality is slightly inhibited in that Hume suggests that it is not that we are not able to know anything about future events based on past experiences, but rather that we are just not rationa...   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1197 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

Human Nature as Viewed by Thomas Hobbes and David Hume

- Human Nature as Viewed by Thomas Hobbes and David Hume Thomas Hobbes in Chapter 13 of Leviathan, and David Hume in Section 3 of An Enquiry Concerning the Princples of Morals, give views of human nature. Hobbes’ view captures survivalism as significant in our nature but cannot account for altruism. We cover Hobbes’ theory with a theory of Varied Levels of Survivalism, explaining a larger body of behavior with the foundation Hobbes gives. Hume gives a scenario which does not directly prove fruitful, but he does capture selfless behavior....   [tags: Philosophy Essays]

Powerful Essays
1952 words | (5.6 pages) | Preview

Free Will And The Concept Of A Person

- Free Will and the Concept of a Person The subject of free will being an actual choice, or being pre-destined has thoroughly been reflected in the minds of philosophers, especially for the purpose of people’s logic. I will argue that both David Hume’s and Harry Frankfurt’s articles on the discussion of free will are cogent, because of compatibilism, in which a human has the ability to have correlation between free will and determinism, as well as, Hume would agree Frankfurt’s concept of second-order violations....   [tags: Free will, Determinism, Causality, David Hume]

Better Essays
1220 words | (3.5 pages) | Preview

David Hume’s Two Definitions of Cause

- David Hume’s Two Definitions of Cause David Hume’s two definitions of cause found in both A Treatise of Human Nature, and An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding have been the center of much controversy in regards to his actual view of causation. Much of the debate centers on the lack of consistency between the two definitions and also with the definitions as a part of the greater text. As for the latter objection, much of the inconsistency can be remedied by sticking to the account presented in the Enquiry, as Hume makes explicit in the Author’s Advertisement that the Treatise was a “work which the Author [Hume] had projected before he left College, and which he wrote and published not...   [tags: Philosophy Essays]

Powerful Essays
3277 words | (9.4 pages) | Preview

John Locke, George Berkeley, and David Hume

- Locke, Berkeley, and Hume Enlightenment began with an unparalleled confidence in human reason. The new science's success in making clear the natural world through Locke, Berkeley, and Hume affected the efforts of philosophy in two ways. The first is by locating the basis of human knowledge in the human mind and its encounter with the physical world. Second is by directing philosophy's attention to an analysis of the mind that was capable of such cognitive success. John Locke set the tone for enlightenment by affirming the foundational principle of empiricism: There is nothing in the intellect that was not previously in the senses....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1082 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

John Locke, George Berkeley and David Hume

- John Locke, Berkeley and Hume are all empiricist philosophers. They all have many different believes, but agree on the three anchor points; The only source of genuine knowledge is sense experience, reason is an unreliable and inadequate route to knowledge unless it is grounded in the solid bedrock of sense experience and there is no evidence of innate ideas within the mind that are known from experience. Each of these philosophers developed some of the most fascinating conceptions of the relationships between our thoughts and the world around us....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Good Essays
1235 words | (3.5 pages) | Preview

The Absurdity Of A Simple Time Telling Device

- The intricacy of a simple time telling device has sparked controversy about the creation of the universe. In William Paley’s “The Analogical Teleological Argument” he argues that the universe must have been created by a universe maker, God, due to its complexity. However, David Hume, provides an empiricist objection by arguing that one cannot prove the existence of a universe maker due to lack of experience regarding the creation of a universe. Ultimately, I will argue that Paley’s argument by design is not sufficient for proving God 's existence because, as individuals, we cannot assume that the world works the way we wish it....   [tags: Teleological argument, Existence, David Hume]

Strong Essays
1173 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

William Paley 's Watch Analogy

- ... I disagree with Aquinas’ stance that all objects should be viewed teleologically simply because I do not have any reason why I should be compelled to accept such a belief. Additionally, if we recognize that there exist mindless being which do not act for an end, then Aquinas’ argument grows weaker because otherwise there would be no explanation for who or what created the rest of the objects which do not have a mind and are not goal-driven. Furthermore, I will argue that in Aquinas’ simplified design argument, Aquinas commits the Birthday Fallacy in (P3): “Hence, there exists a being with a mind who designed all mindless objects that act for an end.”....   [tags: Logic, Scientific method, David Hume]

Better Essays
1185 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

John Locke 's Consent Theory

- John Locke’s consent theory outlines what true consent should look like, but not what specific acts indicate consent. A significant number of institutions claim to have authority over any given individual: landlords, universities, local, state, and federal governments. When does a person consent to these authorities. For some it is obvious but for others it is not, for example, when does someone consent to the government. If one were to join the military, that would be a clear sign of consent. Contrarily, voting is not an act of consent because it does not follow Locke’s outline for consent theory: it is not intentional, informed, or voluntary....   [tags: Democracy, Voter turnout, David Hume]

Better Essays
1132 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

Suicide's Origin in Literature

- David Hume’s “Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion” shields suicide while Emile Durkheim’s “Suicide and Modernity” unearths the causes. Durkheim and Hume label suicide differently because their perspectives varied from the moral structures in their positions. Their causative ideas of suicide are just as dissimilar as their definitions. One of the motives tied to suicide is morality; a topic that has powers vested in the justification and deconstruction of the act. Not only is morality a central subtopic, agency under Durkheim and Hume holds a strong position that affects the way suicide works....   [tags: David Hume, Emile Durkheim, Suicide]

Powerful Essays
1486 words | (4.2 pages) | Preview

What Are Aesthetics?

- When questioning something as controversial as the possibility of a standard of aesthetic judgment, one must take into account the many different perspectives that already exist on the matter. For centuries now, some of the greatest philosophers such as David Hume and Immanuel Kant have attempted to answer this timeless question. However, understandings and interpretations of art are constantly evolving. This has made a clear concise answer difficult to find. Throughout this essay, I will discuss previous opinions and beliefs on the matter, primarily focusing on the ides of philosopher David Hume, then touching on Noel Carroll’s critique of Hume’s philosophy, and then go into further detail...   [tags: David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Philosophy]

Strong Essays
1418 words | (4.1 pages) | Preview

Negative Impact of God on the Minds of David Hume, Christopher Smart, and William Cowper

- Negative Impact of God on the Minds of David Hume, Christopher Smart, and William Cowper David Hume was one of the most influential writers and philosophers of his time. Hume was the second son of Joseph Hume, laird of Ninewells, a small estate in Berwickshire. He was born and raised in Edinburgh, and studied law at Edinburgh University. He left the University without taking a degree with him, however. He spent the next three years living at his fathers, occupying his time primarily with reading and pondering ideas, later to be used in his works....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]

Powerful Essays
1561 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

Cause and Effect in David Hume’s An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding

- Cause and Effect in David Hume’s An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding In An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, David Hume states, “there is not, in any single, particular instance of cause and effect, any thing which can suggest the idea of power or necessary connexion” (Hume, 1993: 41). Hume establishes in section II that all ideas originate from impressions that employ the senses (11). Therefore, in order for there to be an idea of power or “necessary connexion,” there must be impressions of this connection present in single instances of cause and effect; if there are no such impressions, then there cannot be an idea of “necessary connexion” (52)....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]

Better Essays
853 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

David Hume’s an Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals

- Hume was the first thinker to point out the implications of the "representative theory of perception." He had inherited this theory from both his rationalist and empiricist predecessors. According to this view, when one says that he/she perceives something such as an apple, what it actually means is that the one has in the mind a mental idea or image or impression. Such a datum is an internal, mental, subjective representation of something that I assume to be an external, physical, fact....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Better Essays
701 words | (2 pages) | Preview

David Hume on Human Being and Human Knowledge

- Hume is an empiricist and a skeptic. He develops a philosophy that is generally approached in a manner as that of a scientist and therefore he thinks that he can come up with a law for human understanding. Hume investigates the understanding as an empiricist to try and understand the origins of human ideas. Empiricism is the notion that all knowledge comes from experience. Skepticism is the practice of not believing things in nature a priori, but instead investigating things to discover what is really true....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Good Essays
807 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

The Debate Between Freewill And Determinism

- ... Soft determinists, or compatibilists, would look at this as a misinterpretation of the meaning of freewill. They believe in positive definition of freewill, proposing that freewill has been achieved when the actions of an individual match his desires and intentions. Their beliefs are summed up in the words of Arthur Schopenhauer, who said “man can do what he wills, but cannot will what he wills.” What Schopenhauer means to say is that although man may have never had an option to make the opposing decision, it was still the decision that he wanted to make and the one that he chose....   [tags: Free will, Determinism, Causality, David Hume]

Better Essays
1856 words | (5.3 pages) | Preview

Should Free Will Be More Believable Than Determinism

- Why Free Will is More Believable than Determinism Free will is one of the most desired possessions humans have. The ability to choose what we do is very appealing to us. It is also reassuring to put moral responsibility on people to confirm our need to blame and praise. In order to assign moral responsibility, however, free will needs to exist. There have been multiple arguments on how free will cannot be true. One major belief that free will does not exist is determinism. Physicalist, Paul Holbach whole-heartedly believed in determinism meaning every event in the universe is caused by some prior event, including human choices....   [tags: Free will, Determinism, David Hume, Causality]

Better Essays
1049 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Comparing Plato’s Symposium and David Hume’s An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding

- Comparing Plato’s Symposium and David Hume’s An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding Philosophy, when broken down into the original Greek, is philos, which means love, and logos, which means word. Thus philosophy is the love of words or linguistics. There is not one way of viewing this love of words. Both Plato and David Hume examine philosophy in their texts, Symposium and An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, respectively. I will outline, then compare, these two philosophers’ views of philosophy to show that philosophy is a balance....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]

Better Essays
956 words | (2.7 pages) | Preview

John Locke : A Philosophical Doctrine

- John Locke (1683-1704) is known and recognized for many things. One of which being the establishment of natural human rights. However, generically speaking John Locke is named an empiricist. Which by definition is a philosophical doctrine: claiming that all knowledge is only derived from physical sensory experiences. John Locke believed that all that can be humanly learned and understood can only be sought through experience. Consequently Locke believed that concentrating on the exterior realms of reality to by fruitless....   [tags: Philosophy, Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, David Hume]

Better Essays
1498 words | (4.3 pages) | Preview

Metaphysics as Addressed by Kant and Hume

- Metaphysics as Addressed by Kant and Hume In the Prolegomena, Kant states that reading David Hume, "awakened him from his dogmatic slumber." It was Hume's An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding that made Kant aware of issues and prejudices in his life that he had previously been unaware of. This further prompted Kant to respond to Hume with his own analysis on the theory of metaphysics. Kant did not feel that Hume dealt with these matters adequately and resolved to pick up where Hume had left off, specifically addressing the question of whether metaphysics as a science is possible....   [tags: Papers Kant Hume Philosophy Essays]

Powerful Essays
1383 words | (4 pages) | Preview

Locke and Hume on Inequalities of Distribution

- Discuss, compare and contrast the ways in which Locke and Hume defend inequalities of distribution. Does either offer a more convincing defence. Why. This essay seeks to examine the inequalities of distribution of resources and the defences of these inequalities provided by John Locke, in Of Property , and David Hume in Of Justice . Both writings set out the scene in which their theories would evolve. Locke starts with the idea that everything is held in common, and ownership is acquired through ones labour....   [tags: equality, social justice]

Better Essays
928 words | (2.7 pages) | Preview

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.


Your search returned over 400 essays for "David Hume"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>